Stock Id :20545

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A satire of Cuban independence, 1902

GILLAM, Victor.

Can't Run the Thing. Wanted - A good up-to-date chauffeur - one who understands the modern machine. American preferred. Apply to Cuba.
New York: Judge Company, 1902. Chromolithograph. Sheet 340 x 510mm.

Staple holes at centre fold, laid on card.

A motor car marked 'Cuban Government' has hit a rock marked 'Cuba's lack of financial Resources', having veered off 'Sound Government Road'. A 'US exporter' has fallen in a ditch. Uncle Sam, seated before the Capitol, looks on grinning.
In 1902 the US occupation of Cuba after the Spanish-American War ended, and Cuba became an independent country, although limited by the Platt Amendment, a set of American conditions, including the leasing of Guantanamo Bay. This gleeful satire ignores the pillaging of Cuban wealth during the occupation, including cutting tariffs for American imports while maintaining high tariffs for Cuban goods. By 1902 American companies controlled 80% of Cuba's ore exports and owned most of the sugar and cigarette factories; by 1905 Americans owned nearly 10% of Cuba's land.
This satire was published in 'Judge', a Republican satirical magazine published between 1881 and 1947. It was drawn by Victor Gillam (c.1858-1920), a cartoonist who worked for the magazine for twenty years.


Stock ID : 20545

£400

£400

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INDEX

Stock Id :20545

Download Image

A satire of Cuban independence, 1902

GILLAM, Victor.

Can't Run the Thing. Wanted - A good up-to-date chauffeur - one who understands the modern machine. American preferred. Apply to Cuba.
New York: Judge Company, 1902. Chromolithograph. Sheet 340 x 510mm.

Staple holes at centre fold, laid on card.

A motor car marked 'Cuban Government' has hit a rock marked 'Cuba's lack of financial Resources', having veered off 'Sound Government Road'. A 'US exporter' has fallen in a ditch. Uncle Sam, seated before the Capitol, looks on grinning.
In 1902 the US occupation of Cuba after the Spanish-American War ended, and Cuba became an independent country, although limited by the Platt Amendment, a set of American conditions, including the leasing of Guantanamo Bay. This gleeful satire ignores the pillaging of Cuban wealth during the occupation, including cutting tariffs for American imports while maintaining high tariffs for Cuban goods. By 1902 American companies controlled 80% of Cuba's ore exports and owned most of the sugar and cigarette factories; by 1905 Americans owned nearly 10% of Cuba's land.
This satire was published in 'Judge', a Republican satirical magazine published between 1881 and 1947. It was drawn by Victor Gillam (c.1858-1920), a cartoonist who worked for the magazine for twenty years.


Stock ID : 20545

£400

£400

Return To Listing